Information for Your Vintage Pachinko Machine
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Where can I get a key for my pachinko machine?

 

You can’t get keys for pachinko machines. The good news is you don’t need a key.

Why can't I get a key? Pachinko machines were exported from Japan without the keys because those keys could be used to open pachinko machines still being used in the pachinko parlors.

Can I have a key made? Not likely. We have been to many locksmiths and even some national distributors to see if we could have keys made for these vintage locks and the answer was unfortunately no. We have heard over the years a few people were successful getting a key made by a Master locksmith, but we fill that skill is dying out.

What is the lock for anyway? When these machines were in Japan, they were mounted in a wall. The pachinko parlor attendants would walk up to the machine and use a key to open the machine to access the back. As long as your machine is not mounted on the wall, you don't need a key because you have access to the back of the machine.

What if I want to mount my machine on the wall? You have three options. (pictures at bottom of the page)

Option 1 - Disengage the lock mechanism: You can remove the lock latch brackets, but leave the actual lock in place. With the lock latch brackets removed, the machine swings freely open and closed from the frame hinges without a key.

Option 2 - Keep the lock mechanism: Here are a few alternatives.
A) Drill a hole in the side of your cabinet so you can stick a finger in the hole and release lock latches.
B) Remove the lock and run a string/wire/chain through the hole and attach it to the latch. Now you can pull the string to release the latch.
C) Drill a hole in the bottom or top of the cabinet and run a string/wire/chain through the hole and attach it to the latch. This is similar to the previous solution however you can leave the lock in place.

Option 3 - Replace the lock mechanism: 
We have purchased some locks and installed them on a few machines. These locks can be used as a replacement for the original locks, however some modifications will be necessary. You will need to remove the existing lock and hardware and you may need a drill, saw, router or other tools to install the lock in your machine.

 


HomePachinko InformationPachinko Commercials and AdsPachinko MuseumPachinko Owners ManualsHow to Setup Pachinko for Play VideosWho Repairs Pachinko's LinksPachinko RestorationsVintage PachinkoContact Us
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